Best Way To Stick With New Habit

There is incredible power in your daily habits. Your habits quite literally mold your body, your health and your accomplishments in life.

And it turns out that there’s a special secret sauce to making new habits stick that I’d like to share with you today…

This secret sauce goes against our instincts and the way that we are wired, which is why so many of us fail to make healthy, new habits truly stick and become part of our ongoing routine – and ultimately fail to feel good most of the time.

It’s more natural for us to take on the role of a critic with ourselves than that of a cheerleader. We compare ourselves to others and focus on our flaws rather than pausing to celebrate our wins by really feeling good.

This works against us because it is proven emotions create habits and that the positive emotion of FEELING GOOD is the BEST WAY to get a new habit to stick!

Now if you’re anything like me then the idea of celebrating tiny little wins is a bit uncomfortable. I’ll feel good about myself when I do something substantial, you may think.

However, by training yourself to truly FEEL GOOD about each and every step that you take in the right direction, you’re more likely to keep on making progress.

It’s time to tell your inner critic to take a hike! All those times that you wallowed in feeling bad only made it more difficult to make positive progress toward your goals.

Once you capture the power of feeling good, you’ll train yourself to enjoy and celebrate all of the healthy new behaviors that will ultimately lead you to your goal.

Do I have your commitment to try out the secret sauce of feeling good?

When you wake up and eat a healthy breakfast, pause and give yourself a mental pat on the back. FEEL GOOD ABOUT IT! Really, actually, FEEL GOOD.

It may take some practice, but with time you’ll look forward to feeling good after practicing each healthy new behavior.

We are here to help you with your fitness goals!

Don’t Stop Here

More To Explore

Dry Needling

Dry needling has various, well-documented positive effects on the body including increased blood flow, reduced inflammation, improved tissue healing, desensitization of peripheral and central pain mechanisms and activation of the body’s pain modulation systems (reduction of pain), reduced inflammatory markers, and improved endocrine function. The physiological effects of needling are significant, and the literature/evidence suggests that dry needling can serve as an extremely effective therapeutic intervention for various musculoskeletal pain syndromes with extremely good outcomes.

Affects of Exercise on the Brain

1. Exercise Wards Off Anxiety and DepressionPerhaps because exercise stimulates the nervous system and releases a variety of chemicals in the brain, it has been

Obesity – Our Biggest Pandemic

While the world is currently focused on a higher-profile pandemic, there is another, quieter one that kills over 2.8 million people globally each year: obesity.

Scroll to Top